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Press


splashpadINTERVIEW IN WATER INSTITUTE ANNUAL REPORT 

Amphibious houses that rise and fall with flood waters could help save lives and protect First Nations and other vulnerable communities devastated by flooding every spring. University of Waterloo architecture professor and Water Institute member, Dr. Elizabeth English says amphibious housing allows homeowners to evacuate with peace of mind, knowing that when they return, their houses will have little, if any, damage.

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the-weather-network-logoAMPHIBIOUS HOUSING FEATURED ON TORONTO WEATHER NETWORK

A weather network segment on the benefits of amphibious architecture, and applications of buoyant foundations.

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the-weather-network-logoHOMES DESIGNED TO FLOAT ON WATER COULD BE THE WAY OF THE FUTURE

Flooding is almost a yearly occurrence in parts of Canada. 
The northern Ontario communities of Fort Albany and Kashechewan have been dealing with seasonal floods for years. They disrupt daily life, and threaten the health of residents.

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WATERLOO PROFESSOR DESIGNS FLOATING HOUSES THAT CAN WEATHER FLOODS

University of Waterloo professor Elizabeth English has designed an amphibious house that floats up with rising flood waters and then settles back down on its foundation when water recedes.

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gec_logo.jpgCOULD AMPHIBIOUS BUILDINGS BE PART OF THE SOLUTION FOR FLOOD-PRONE JAMES BAY COMMUNITIES?

In May 2014 flooding forced the people of Attawapiskat, Ontario, to evacuate their Subarctic First Nation community. It was not the first time. Persistent spring flooding regularly disturbs life and threatens health in Attawapiskat and its James Bay neighbours, Fort Albany and Kashechewan.

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Waterloo_logo_horizontal-4.jpgFLOATING HOUSES THAT RISE AND FALL WITH FLOOD WATERS

Amphibious houses that rise and fall with flood waters would help save lives and protect First Nations and other vulnerable communities devastated by flooding every spring, says a University of Waterloo architecture professor.

ENRAMPHIBIOUS-HOUSE PROMOTER IS ON A CRUSADE FOR NEW HOMES AND RETROFITS THAT GO WITH THE FLOW

Featured in ENR magazine, Elizabeth English gives her insight into a solution to amphibious flood-resistant buildings and pushes for a reinterpretation of the statutes of the insurance program in the U.S.

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NEW ORLEANS: NO EASY BUOYANCY

Five years after evacuation, still-displaced residents of New Orleans have a strong desire to return to their former communities. Pre-Katrina New Orleans was a vibrant community of hard-working residents, and had a dynamic street life of neighbourhood parades that bound communities, creating strong identities and a strong sense of place.


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423030_10150594579876401_1610353551_n.jpgCOULD FLOATING HOMES BE ON THE WAY?

What are the options for bayou residents whose houses have flooded three times in the last decade? Do you elevate? Move? Pray? Or do you build a house that can float?

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rex-thumbFLOATING AN IDEA: PROF GOES WITH THE FLOW TO PROTECT HOMES FROM FLOODS

Elizabeth English loves her job as an architecture professor at the University of Waterloo, but her heart remains in Louisiana. That's where her passion for preserving the culture and character of New Orleans has led her, to challenge the conventional wisdom about how to protect homes from flood damage.

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Waterloo logo horizontal-4UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO FACULTY OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

Elizabeth English has designed a foundation that can float a house. She wants to use it to help rebuild New Orleans.

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RISING TO THE OCCASION

A Louisiana State University engineering professor made the rounds of congressional staff and Bush administration officials this week to push a system she says could protect many homes from the kind of disastrous flooding that occurred in Hurricane Katrina.

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BUOYANT FOUNDATIONS WOULD ALLOWS HOMES TO FLOAT OUT OF HARM'S WAY DURING FLOODS, LSU ENGINEER SAYS

A Louisiana State University engineering professor made the rounds of congressional staff and Bush administration officials this week to push a system she says could protect many homes from the kind of disastrous flooding that occurred in Hurricane Katrina.

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Amphibious Architecture: A Strategy for Flood-Resilient Housing

As global climate change causes sea levels to rise and weather events to become more extreme, the occurrence of severe floods will become more common around the world. The large populations living in deltaic or riverine floodplain regions will be particularly severely affected, especially those living at the lowest levels of income.

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XMWy2Z50.jpegNEW ORLEANS: TWO YEARS LATER

It's difficult to nail down the last time this antique city was considered cutting edge. Was it the 1850s, when a coffeehouse owner created the Sazerac cocktail? Or perhaps the 1940s, when a teenager named J.M. Lapeyre invented the automatic shrimp peeler?
thedailygreen_main.jpgTWO YEARS AFTER THE STORM, THE DEVASTATED CITY IS A BOOMTOWN OF FRESH IDEAS FOR REBIRTH

Much of New Orleans continues to lie abandoned and destroyed, even a full two years after Hurricane Katrina swept through the region with a vengeance. The Louisiana city still struggles with severe economic problems, dysfunctional government and the toxic residue left in place after the storm waters receded.

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NEW BUOYANT FOUNDATION SYSTEM HOPES TO SAVE HOMES FROM FLOODING

One of the biggest losses to the people along the Gulf Coast during Hurricane Katrina was their homes. Now, LSU has unveiled its prototype of an invention to protect homes from floodwaters.
seattle-times-logo-2.jpgLOUISIANA PROFESSOR PROPOSES IDEA FOR MAKING HOUSES FLOOD PROOF

A Louisiana State University engineering professor is lobbying congressional staff and Bush administration officials to push a system she says could protect many homes from the kind of disastrous flooding that occurred in Hurricane Katrina.

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PLAN WOULD MAKE HOMES IN NEW ORLEANS FLOATABLE

The next time a hurricane floods New Orleans, whole neighbourhoods might just bob up like corks as the water rises.

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